Tuesday, August 15, 2017

Important Solar Eclipse Information

Solar Eclipse | August 21

A total solar eclipse will occur next Monday, August 21, 2017, in some parts of the country; Pasco County will see between a 60 percent and 80 percent solar eclipse. This eclipse is special because people can only see it from inside the United States. It is the first time that an eclipse like this has happened in nearly 100 years.

Some Pasco County Schools dismiss at 2:50 p.m., the time when looking directly at the eclipse can cause the most damage to the eyes. It is important to talk to students about safety precautions both at school and at home!


OPTIONS FOR PARENTS

EDUCATIONAL PLANS FOR THE ECLIPSE

No Pasco County elementary schools will have lessons outdoors, but some secondary school activities will be outdoors. All outdoor eclipse lessons will use proper safety procedures. All participants must use solar viewers verified to be compliant with the ISO 12312-2 International Safety Standard. If a viewing activity is organized by a teacher as part of a science lesson, parents must complete a signed parent permission form for each participating student and return it to their teacher by Monday morning, August 21.

Link to Parent Permission Form

Parents who do not want their children to be a part of any outdoor eclipse plan must let their school know in advance.

At this time, all Pasco County Schools will operate on their regular schedules, but some may use rainy day dismissal procedures to ensure students are supervised. If parents want their children to view the eclipse at home, they can pick them up early or keep children at home that day; it will be an excused absence if accompanied by a note from a parent.

ALL ACTIVITIES, INCLUDING P.E., RECESS, AND ATHLETIC PRACTICES, WILL BE HELD INDOORS FROM 1:15 p.m. to 4:15 p.m.

IMPORTANT SAFETY CAUTION: Do Not Look Up!

VIEWING SAFETY

The only 100 percent safe way to view the uneclipsed or partially eclipsed sun is on TV or online. Looking directly at the uneclipsed or partially eclipsed sun can permanently damage your eyes. The only safe way to view the eclipse outdoors is through special-purpose solar filters, such as eclipse glasses or handheld solar viewers. Homemade filters or ordinary sunglasses, even very dark ones, are not safe for looking at the sun. Click here for additional information on safe viewing and reputable safety glasses vendors.

An alternative method for safe viewing of the partially eclipsed sun is with a pinhole projector . With this method, sunlight streams through a small hole – such as a pencil hole in a piece of paper, or even the space between your fingers – onto a makeshift screen, such as a piece of paper or the ground. It’s important to watch the screen, not the sun.

RESOURCES

Below is information pulled from the NASA eclipse website: https://goo.gl/ouw9DS.

 

VIEW THE NASA TV broadcast – Live video streams from locations across the country will be available at:

https://www.nasa.gov/eclipselive

SOCIAL MEDIA

The 2017 solar eclipse is shaping up to be one of the biggest science events of the digital era. NASA will provide social media updates via the agency’s flagship accounts onFacebook,Twitter,Tumblr,Instagram,Snapchat,Google+, and LinkedIn.

NASA is also providing live streaming coverage during the eclipse via the NASA App and on the following social media streaming sites:

Several more NASA social media accounts will have information about the eclipse.

PHOTOGRAPHY AND VIDEOS

To view and download NASA eclipse photography on Aug. 21, visit:

https://www.flickr.com/photos/nasahqphoto

All imagery and videos are in the public domain and can be used with the proper credit. For more information, please see NASA’s Media Usage Guidelines at:

​​ https://www.nasa.gov/multimedia/guidelines

For more information on viewing safety, eclipse activities, and observing assets, visit:

https://eclipse2017.nasa.gov